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Yale University Class of 2010

Yale Regular Decision Admit Rate at 5.8 Percent

Yale's overall acceptance rate for this year hit an Ivy League record low of 8.6 percent. 21,099 students applied and 1,823 students were accepted. The acceptance rate for the regular decision pool of 18,976 -- which included 1,961 students deferred from early admission -- was 5.8 percent. In the early round of admissions, 724 of 4,084 applicants were accepted for a 17.7 percent acceptance rate, also a record low.

Approximately 700 students, or 3 percent of the total applicant pool, were placed on the wait list this year.

Slightly more men than women were admitted, with 895 women and 925 men deemed Eli material. Approximately 44 percent of admitted students are minorities or international students.

Yale saw a 3.4 percent increase in the number of early action applications, totaling 4,065 compared to 3,933 last year. 724 students were accepted, for an acceptance rate of 17.7%.

Regular applications increased 8.8 percent this year, as more than 16,889 students applied to Yale this year, compared to 15,525 last year.

The greatest increases in applications received were from African-American and Latino students.